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Does this compound reverse aging?

Updated: Dec 24, 2022

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a coenzyme that plays a vital role in human health. It is found in all living cells and is involved in a variety of important physiological processes, including energy production, DNA repair, and gene expression (1).


One of the primary roles of NAD is to facilitate the transfer of electrons during the process of cellular respiration, which is the main source of energy for the body's cells (2). NAD acts as a carrier of electrons during the breakdown of glucose and other nutrients to produce ATP, the primary source of energy for the body's cells (3).





NAD is also involved in the regulation of gene expression, as it acts as a signaling molecule that helps to modulate the activity of certain proteins (4). This process is known as NAD-dependent protein deacetylation and plays a role in various cellular processes, including DNA repair and inflammation (5).


There is some evidence to suggest that NAD supplementation may have a variety of potential health benefits. For example, some studies have shown that NAD may be effective in reducing the symptoms of substance abuse disorders, such as alcohol and drug dependencies (6). However, these findings are based on small, early stage studies and more research is needed to confirm these results.


Other potential benefits of NAD supplementation include improving energy levels, enhancing cognitive function, and supporting cardiovascular health (7). However, the evidence supporting these claims is limited and more research is needed to fully understand the potential benefits and risks of NAD supplementation.


NAD is a vital coenzyme that plays a critical role in human health. While there is some evidence to suggest that NAD supplementation may have a variety of potential health benefits, more research is needed to fully understand its effects and determine its safety and effectiveness. To see if NAD+ is right for you visit us at Mulberry Vitamin Infusions.




References:


Littarru, G. P., & Tiano, L. (2007). Coenzyme Q10: an overview. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 28(1-2), 1-17.

Linnane, A. W., Eastwood, H., & Duley, J. A. (1987). Human nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Biochemistry, 26(9), 2613-2622.

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/science/nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide

Imai, S., & Guarente, L. (2014). NAD+ and sirtuins in aging and disease. Trends in Cell Biology, 24(8), 464-471.

Kang, J., & Sinclair, D. A. (2015). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD): a vital molecule for cellular metabolism and signaling. Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, 26(6), 345-352.

Zsila, F., Süle, B., Kökönyei, G., & Demetrovics, Z. (2018). The role of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in substance use disorders: A systematic review. Addictive Behaviors, 81, 84-91.

Kang, J., & Sinclair, D. A. (2015). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD): a vital molecule for cellular metabolism and signaling. Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, 26(6), 345-352.

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